I’ve been writing several pet projects in the last months. I wrote them mostly to learn new languages, techniques or libraries, and I’m unsure as to how much I’ll use them at all. Not that it matters. All three are related to role-playing games. In case you’re interested:

  • Character suite: a program to help create characters for RPGs. It’s designed to make it easy to add new rule systems for new games. It’s written in Clojure and ClojureScript, and with it I learned devcards, macros, Clojure’s core.async, figwheel and PDF generation with PDFBox. The code is messy in parts, but I learned a lot and I have a usable result, which is the important thing.
  • Nim-DR: a tiny command-line program to roll dice, including adding aliases for rolls (eg. alias “pc” for “1d100”). It doesn’t even support mixing kinds of dice, or adding numbers to the result. I mostly wrote it to get a taste of Nim. While I’m not a big fan of statically typed languages, the type inference really helped, and I liked what I saw. I may try more experiments in Nim in the future.
  • Map discoverer: a program to uncover a map bit by bit. You can use it online. I wrote it to learn ES6, the new JavaScript standard, and a bit about the HTML5 canvas element. I used Babel to translate ES6 to regular JavaScript (I could have used Node 4, but Babel supports much more ES6) and es6-features.org as a reference to learn the new bits. I really liked ES6: it still feels like JavaScript, but it improves things here and there. I just wished let didn’t allow re-assignment of variables.

While writing the last one I even learned about the pointer-events CSS property, which allows you to mark an element as not receiving events like mouseclick, mousemove, etc. Very useful!