Lately I've been eating vegetarian at work. It's been more than one month since I started, and that also included the Christmas Party dinner (wasn't sure about it, esp. after hearing some awful stories about "vegetarian is the same dish as the other one, only removing the meat"; but finally I decided to go for it… and it turned out to be yummy!). Note that I not only not claim to be a vegetarian, I don't even claim to have it as a goal.

I guess the first question is "why?". Some people have suggested/assumed that maybe I'm spending too much time with a certain person :-P I'm sure that has somehow paved the way or helped, but actually I never thought of changing my eating habits until I saw a film called "Sharkwater". Sharkwater is a documentary about sharks that shows some of the misconceptions about them and the cruelty there is towards them (mostly shark finning). When talking about the possibility of shark extinction, it explains that it can be a huge problem with the planet's oxygen supply. The film got me thinking, and I also connected some dots with stuff I had read on the Meat-Free Mondays website. Also, watching Sylvia Earle's TED talk made me think even more about the impact of people's eating habits in the world. And I realised that I was eating meat in almost every single meal, every single day, so I decided to change it for the environment, for my health, and for the craic.

So I guess the next question is "why not go all the way and really become a vegetarian?". That's a good question. For one, I don't have that moral thing with animals. Not yet anyway. Maybe I just have to watch a couple of documentaries ;-) Another important point is that I don't live alone, and I can't really impose my view of the world or eating habits on anyone (although we're doing meat-free dinners on Monday so I can have Meat-Free Mondays, yay!). Third, I'm not even sure I'm currently able to: I mean, giving up on sushi? For life? I doubt I can do that. Now, limiting myself to eating it, say, just a couple of times a year… sure thing. And finally, as the main reasons for the change were practical (health and environment), I currently don't feel I need to completely give up on meat. I guess it's a matter of economics. Sort of.